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The Institute

The purposes of the Institute are:

  • to develop theoretical foundations for the field of OAE
  • to develop professional standards that recognize commonality and diversity
  • to undertake research and implement projects to influence the quality of practice
  • to identify and develop areas of commonality with environmental education

The Institute will achieve this by:

  • developing networks and exchanges for academic staff, students and practitioners
  • facilitating conferences
  • promoting information exchanges through electronic media, publications and congresses
  • coordinating collaborative research projects
  • developing transnational codes of practice
  • developing professional development programmes and core curricula for programmes to achieve an international accepted degree
  • monitoring and evaluating the quality of provision

Founded in 1996 the European Institute is a non-governmental association registered at the magistrates` court of Marburg in Germany.

For more detailed information we invite you to read our Statute and Statement of Intent or contact our board members.

To order our newsletter or to contact EOE with another request please send an e-mail to: contact@eoe-network.eu.

§ 1
(1) The name of the registered association is: “European Institute of Outdoor Adventure Education and Experiential Learning” (EOE)

(2) Its headquarters are in Marburg/Lahn, Federal State of Hessen, Germany. The financial year is the calendar year.

(3) The association should be registered at the magistrates’ court of Marburg.

§ 2
(1) The purpose of the association is the promotion of formation and education in the European area.

(2) The purposes declared in the statutes will particularly be realized by: – Projects, especially youth projects and exchange programs in the field of Outdoor Adventure Education and Experiential Learning – Research on the theory of Outdoor Adventure Education to promote the quality of practice – Development of professional standards – The building of European networks between social and youth workers, teachers and educators, academics and students – The organization of European conferences and conventions – Distribution of information through electronic media and publications (print media) – The co-ordination and implementation of European research projects – The development of curricula and the assistance and evaluation of projects

§3
(1) The association is working selflessly; its purposes are not in the first place to make profits for itself.

(2) The associations’ funds and resources can only be used for purposes declared in the statute. Members are not allowed to receive financial contributions from the funds of the association.

(3) No person should be favoured by expenditures that are alien to the purpose of the association or should receive disproportionately high compensations.

§4
(1) Membership of the organization can be attained by individuals and legal entities

(2) Application for membership has to be sent in written form to the executive committee. The executive committee approves applications.

(3) Membership is lost by – Death – Expulsion. The executive committee may expel members for a relevant reason. The affected member has to be given the opportunity to comment on the reason. Resignation.

(4) Resignation is only possible at the end of a calendar year. The executive committee has to receive a notice of resignation in writing. A period of notice of four weeks should be kept.

§5
(1) The membership fee will be fixed by the general meeting.

(2) The executive committee may allow reduced payments in exceptional circumstances.

§6
The executive bodies of the association are: – the general meeting – the executive committee. The work and activities of the general meeting and the executive committee are regarded as honorable.

§7
(1) The executive committee consists of a chairperson, the vice-chairperson, the treasurer and a Maximum of five additional members of the executive committee.

(2) Under § 26 Bundesgesetzbuch, Federal Statute Book the executive committee is constituted by the chairperson, the vice-chairperson and the treasurer. Each member of the executive committee represents the association judicially and extra judicially. Two members of the executive committee are allowed to act as substitutes for a chairperson.

(3) The members of the executive committee are elected by the general meeting for a period of two years. Members of the executive committee can be re-elected. The chairperson, the treasurer and the vice-chairperson are elected by the members of the executive committee.

(4) The executive committee manages the current business of the association.

(5) Executive committee meetings have a quorum when at least four board members are present. Resolutions of the executive committee need a simple majority of the members present. Resolutions of the executive committee are recorded and signed by the chairperson. If the chairperson is absent the minutes are signed by the second chairperson and the secretary.

§ 8
(1) The executive committee has to summon at least one annual general meeting. It has to be announced five weeks in advance in a circular informing all members of the agenda. Members have the opportunity to ask for topics to be put on the agenda and to inform the executive committee on matters that should be resolved at the general meeting. Applications for the agenda have to be sent in writing to the executive committee at least one week before the general meeting

(2) The agenda presented by the executive committee has to be approved by the general meeting.

(3) According to the statute the general meeting is the supreme executive body of the association. The annual account and the annual report have to be presented for acceptance at the general meeting in written form. To check and accept the annual account and annual report the general meeting employs two auditors, who are neither members of the executive committee nor members of a committee that has been appointed by the executive committee. The general meeting decides on: • the tasks of the association • involvement and participation in other societies • approval of all standing orders that regulate matters of the association • amendments of the statute • dissolution of the association.

(4) Extraordinary general meetings have to be summoned if at least one third of the executive committee members or one tenth of the associations’ members or at least fifty percent of the full-time employees ask for a meeting in written form indicating the purpose and cause. Full-time employees are people employed by the organization, whose average working hours come up to at least half of the standard working hours (weekly). An extraordinary general meeting has to be summoned, if it is of interest of the association (under § 36 Bundesgesetzbuch, Federal Statute).

(5) Resolutions are passed by a simple majority of the members attending the general meeting. In order to decide on amendments of the statute there has to be a majority of ¾ of the members present. These ¾ of the members voting for amendment must at least be a number of 1/10 of all members of the association.

(6) Each general meeting has to be recorded. The minutes have to be signed by a member of the board and a member of the association who has been addressed by the secretary at the beginning of the general meeting.

§ 9
The purchase and sale of property, mortgages/charges on property and rights equivalent to real property, standing security and the conclusion of warranty contracts have to be approved by the general meeting.

Further the general meeting decides if loans are taken up, when the amount of the loans exceeds the sum of 2.500,00 EURO.

§ 10
(1) In case of dissolution or abolition of the association or in case of loss of its tax privileged purposes the assets of the association are passed to the ‘Deutscher Paritätischer Wohlfahrtsverband Landesverband Hessen e.V.’ (German parity welfare association, registered association of the Federal State of Hessen’). The association must use it directly for charitable purposes and public welfare. The general meeting decides how the assets will be passed and distributed.

(2) Resolution on the dissolution of the association needs a majority of 3/4 of the members attending the general meeting. The dissolution can only be resolved if it has been announced in the invitation to the general meeting. The members must receive the announcement in an appropriate period of time before the general meeting.

There are many views concerning outdoor adventure education. It also operates in many contexts including, formal and non-formal education, youth social work, adult education and therapeutic work. There is, however, a great deal of common ground.

The aims of OAE are generally understood to be to develop an awareness of and respect for self, others and the environment. Whilst some forms of OAE claim to address al three of these themes, others foreground one or two with the others becoming background and context. The land or seascape, the other people present as peers or facilitators and the choice of activity are all considered significant pedagogic elements. Outcomes claimed range from academic, personal, social, environmental, aesthetic to spiritual in nature. Impacts include affects on identity, relationships, confidence, aspiration, well being, sense of place, values, knowledge, skills, academic performance, group cohesion, purpose and maturation.

Practitioners seem to agree that OAE comprises direct experience (i.e. experiential education) and active learning (i.e. learning by doing), a journeying element, outdoor activities and simple and extended community living. There is generally a strong belief in holistic and student centred approaches.

Professional standards tend to focus on the skills of teaching and learning, building a learning community, physical and emotional safety and the protection of the environment from overuse.

History


The European Institute for Outdoor Adventure Education and Experiential Learning (EOE) was founded 1996 in Spital (Austria) by people from the academic, social and youth work fields who were all interested in bringing together practitioners, teachers and researchers from different European countries. If you are interested in the history of the EOE please read the detailed report about the context, foundation, programme and experiences of the first decade of our existence.

Read more (pdf)

Statement of Intent

What is outdoor adventure education?

There are many views concerning outdoor adventure education. It also operates in many contexts including, formal and non-formal education, youth social work, adult education and therapeutic work. There is, however, a great deal of common ground.

The aims of OAE are generally understood to be to develop an awareness of and respect for self, others and the environment. Whilst some forms of OAE claim to address al three of these themes, others foreground one or two with the others becoming background and context. The land or seascape, the other people present as peers or facilitators and the choice of activity are all considered significant pedagogic elements. Outcomes claimed range from academic, personal, social, environmental, aesthetic to spiritual in nature. Impacts include affects on identity, relationships, confidence, aspiration, well being, sense of place, values, knowledge, skills, academic performance, group cohesion, purpose and maturation.

Practitioners seem to agree that OAE comprises direct experience (i.e. experiential education) and active learning (i.e. learning by doing), a journeying element, outdoor activities and simple and extended community living. There is generally a strong belief in holistic and student centred approaches.

Professional standards tend to focus on the skills of teaching and learning, building a learning community, physical and emotional safety and the protection of the environment from overuse.

Issues affecting the development of OAE

These are some of the key trends and issues influencing the directions in which OAE is developing:

Mind and body.
There have been many debates over the centuries about the relationship between mind and body. In modern education, the debate concerns whether or not a primarily intellectual form of education is adequate for the proper development of the individual, or whether a more direct, non-abstract form of educational experience is more appropriate

Relationship between the individual and society.
As civilization moves and change accelerates, many individuals become disconnected from society. They feel that they have no control and influence through the political process to bring about beneficial changes in their lives and within their communities. Practitioners can work outdoors to help people to identify areas where they can take control of their lives and take a more active part in their communities.

Relationship between individuals and the environment.
Environmental issues are of increasing importance in the political agenda, yet many people live an urban life which does not allow them to experience the relationship between their actions and the elements which support life on earth. Outdoor adventure education can provide direct contact with the natural world, which can enable people to develop informed values and opinions.

The Board Members

Irena Kokalj

(Slovenia) Chair

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Dr. Chris Loynes

(UK-England) Vice Chair

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Martin Lindner

(Germany) Treasurer

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Tomás Aylward

(Ireland)

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Geoff Cooper

(UK-England)

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Richard Irvine

(UK-England)

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Tanja Liimatainen

(Finland)

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Sibylle Roth

(Germany)

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Irena Kokalj

She holds a BSc in biology and has a specialisation in the field of environmental education. For several years she has been a teacher of biology in secondary school and a teacher of natural science in CŠOD. Her special interest lies in development of didactic approaches in outdoor programs. Irena is the author of many articles about outdoor education in Slovenia presented at national and international meetings and published in professional textbooks and magazines. She has proven her leadership skills by planning and implementing major events at CŠOD that included several hundreds of participants. Irena has successfully coordinated activities and significantly contributed in obtaining EU funding for projects with EOE (e.g. partners for youth exchange and exchange of teachers at their workplaces). She was responsible for local organization and was leading the EOE conference in Planica in 2010 and Bohinj in 2018. Irena has been a co-opted member of EOE board since 2010 and a member of EOE board since 2014. She has the full support from her institution, the CŠOD.

Interests:
Outdoor education practice in connection with school curriculum.

Dr. Chris Loynes

I am Reader in Outdoor Studies at the University of Cumbria. I also direct Threshold which consults in the UK and internationally for universities, education departments and experiential education organisations.

Current interests
The application of the outdoors to youth transition; the wider and more effective use by schools of outdoor and residential experiences; exploring the application of outdoor, experiential approaches to raising issues of sustainability through non-formal education and adult learning.

Recent publication
Becker, P., Humberstone, B., Loynes, C. & Schirp, J. (Eds.) (2018) The Changing World of Outdoor Learning in Europe. London: Routledge.

Loynes, C. (2018) Consider Your Trace. In Becker, P., Humberstone, B., Loynes, C. & Schirp, J. (Eds.) (2018) The Changing World of Outdoor Learning in Europe. London, UK. Routledge.

Loynes, C. & Pedersen Gurholt, K. (2017) The journey as a transcultural experience for international students. Journal of Geography in Higher Education. 41.4 DOI: 10.1080/03098265.2017.1337734

Loynes, C. (2017). Theorising of outdoor education: theory and practice. In T. Jeffs and J. Ord (eds), Outdoor, Experiential and Informal Education: beyond the confines. London, UK. Routledge.

Loynes, C. (2017) The Renaissance of Residential Experiences: Their contribution to outdoor learning. In Waite S (Ed) Children Learning Outside the Classroom: From Birth to Eleven 2nd Ed. Los Angeles, Sage. pp. 209-221.

Prince, H.E. and Loynes, C. (2016) Adventure, nature and commodification. In Davis, P. & Convery, I. (eds) Shifting interpretations of natural heritage. Boydell & Brewer: Newcastle University ‘Heritage Matters Series’. pp. 231-237.

Backman, E., Humberstone, B. and Loynes, C. (Eds.) (2014). Urban nature: inclusive learning through youth work and school work. Stockholm, Sweden.

Contact
chris.loynes(at)cumbria.ac.uk

Martin Lindner

He is a freelancer. He has worked for the bsj-Marburg in the field of Youth Work. He then has been a lecturer at the University of Marburg in the field of adventure and education (Bildung). Involved in the development of national and international masters degree he worked as the coordinator of an Erasmus Mundus Joint Masters Degree (TEOS – Transcultural European Outdoor Studies). Since 2017 he is a Research Fellow at the University of Cumbria.

Recent publication
Lindner, M. (2018), Adventure Based Counseling – Das Abenteuerlabor, in: Michl, W. & Seidel, H. (Hg.): Handbuch Erlebnispädagogik, München: Reinhardt-Verlag (60-63)

Becker, P.; Lindner, M. & Vollmar, M. (2018), TEOS – an academic discourse about the European Outdoor Culture in a continually further globalising world, in: Becker, P., Humberstone, B., Loynes, C. and Schirp, J., eds.: The changing world of outdoor learning in Europe. London: Routledge (pp. 117-130)

Vollmar, M. & Lindner, M. (2018), No risk, no experience – Imbalances in the safety-provisions discourse from the outdoor-pedagogical perspective, in: Becker, P., Humberstone, B., Loynes, C. and Schirp, J., eds.: The changing world of outdoor learning in Europe. London: Routledge (pp. 131-143)

Andkjaer, S.; Boyes, M; Lindner, M. & Potter, T. (accepted paper), The role of planning in outdoor adventure decision-making,: Journal of Adventure Education & Outdoor Learning

Tomás Aylward

Tomás Aylward is a lecturer in Outdoor and Experiential Learning at the I.T.Tralee, a Higher Education Institution in Co. Kerry on the Atlantic coast of Ireland. He lectures on degree programmes in Outdoor Learning, Health & Leisure studies, Adapted Physical Activity and Field Biology/Wildlife Tourism. He is a current coopted-board member European Federation of Adapted Physical Activity (EUFAPA). In 30 years working with people out-of-doors, Tomás has been a youth worker, a manager of a local education authority Outdoor Education centre and the chief instructor and later director of Tiglin, the former national outdoor centre for Ireland. He continues to have an evolving outdoor learning practice with influences from adventure sports as well as experiential education and environmental education. He is particularly influenced by practices from the Nordic countries. He has presented papers on Outdoor Education topics at national and international conferences in Ireland, U.K., Iceland, France, Belgium, Finland and Romania.

Geoff Cooper

Fellow of Institute for Outdoor Learning, Chair of Adventure and Environmental Awareness Group, UK. Author of “Outdoors with Young People- A Leader’s Guide to Outdoor Activities, the Environment and Sustainability”

Interests
The contribution of outdoor learning to environmental awareness, sustainability and global understanding. Aesthetic approaches, Place-based and Inter-generational learning. The role of Outdoor Education Centres.

Publication
Cooper, G. (2018) The Changing Character of Outdoor Education Centres in the UK, In Becker, P., Humberstone, B., Loynes, C. & Schirp, J. (Eds.) (2018) The Changing Face of the Outdoors in Europe. London, UK. Routledge.

Cooper, G. (2018) The Case for a more relevant Outdoor Education, In Leather, M. (2018) Atmospheres and Hauntings: Book of Extended Abstracts for the European Institute for Outdoor Adventure Education and Experiential Learning Conference #EOE2017, Plymouth.

Cooper, G. (2016) Outdoor Education, Environment and Sustainability: youth, society and environment, In Humberstone, B., Prince, H. & Henderson, K. (Eds.) (2016) Routledge International Handbook of Outdoor Studies. Oxon, UK. Routledge.

Richard Irvine

I am an independent outdoor educator and trainer based in south west England. I work with all age groups from pre-school children to adults in woodland environments on long and short term programmes including offering accredited ‘Forest School’ training. My main interest at the moment is in the role of manual craft skills in outdoor experiences. I have been involved with EOE since attending the inspiring 2011 conference in Metsäkartano and have since collaborated with a number of EOE partners on several other events. I am also currently an associate lecturer on the Outdoor Adventure Education Degree course at Plymouth Marjon University. EOE has offered me experiences, conversations and intellectual challenges that have influenced me and developed my outlook and work more than any other professional development I have undertaken. Having gained so much, I would like to put something back into the network and contribute to its future as a member of the board.

Tanja Liimatainen

Adventure and environmental educator. Tanja Liimatainen is coordinator in Youth Centre Metsäkartano in Finland. She is a practitioner working with groups and creating educational programs for past 20 years. She has been member of Finnish national adventure education board for eight years. Her passion is to gather all outdoor educators together to make magic happen with educational programs and in environmental awareness. She is involved with ENOC project 2018-2020 “Aesthetics through the Outdoors”. She has been actively involved with EOE network since 2009 and been a board member for two years.

Sibylle Roth

Sibylle Roth currently is a Phd Student at the Chair of Forest and Environmental Policy in Freiburg. Here she does her research on “Muße” in the forest which looks into space perception, contemplation and art of idleness of individuals in forests. Beside the PhD she is lecturer at polytechnics in Germany, one module captures the field of “City Bound” the other modules within the study of Social Science are mainly taught through experiential learning methods. Sibylle is a Social Worker and did parts of her practical Training in experiential learning (2008) with Erlebnistage und Schattenspringer (both German institutions) studied the MA Abenteuer- und Erlebnispädgogik in Marburg and took three terms of the programme in Wales under the lead of Dr Andy Williams (2012). She got the chance to work with the bsj and ALEA which enlarged the horizon of experience in the field even further. 2013 she founded her Outdoor Education Institution together with three colleagues called Stadtflucht and worked here self employed. With the move to the UK the institution – which still runs in the south of Germany – got left behind for the exploration of new opportunities. Sibylle is engaged in EOE work since the conference was held in Finnland (2010) where she got the chance to support the Finnish delegation with the set up. Since 2016 she is co-opted member. Her passion within the Outdoors are sailing, canoeing and kayaking, hiking, walking as well as land art and contemplative ways of exploring the outdoors with all senses. Being a Yoga instructor too she likes to explore and challenge the human body and mind within the outdoors to develop, flourish and become a better self, in ways of selflearning but also regarding taking responsibility in society.

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